Yankee Hill Machine Nitro N20

You could definitely say that I am a fan of Yankee Hill Machine, my very first suppressor was a YHM, and my most recent purchase is beginning to show a trend. My experience with YHM suppressors has always been a simple no-nonsense one, but much like some others in the industry, the good people at YHM are evolving their products. This is welcome news for all of us who endure the tiring infringement by authoritative acronyms from the federal government.

Yankee Hill Machine

Yankee Hill Machine has been in the business since the 1950’s, a family business that has grown over the last seventy years. The Graham Brothers have recently broadened the different offerings from YHM, as well as spun off another brand of bolt-action rifle accessories called Graham Brothers Rifleworks. 

The Nitro N20

The Nitro N20 is a next generation suppressor as far as I can tell, it is following a brilliant trend in the suppressor industry. The Nitro is a modular suppressor, meaning it can be adapted to whatever host you might install it. The back end of the Nitro features the same common threads from other suppressor manufacturers, allowing the user to use an assortment of mounting configurations. The YHM offerings include a direct thread cap in popular thread pitches like 1/2-28 or 5/8-24. You can also install a Nielsen Booster to run on your semi-auto pistol , or one of the Phantom QD muzzle break devices that YHM offers. 

In addition to its diverse mounting options, the Nitro also has a detachable forward segment, allowing the user to run it in a long and quieter composition, or it can be removed to run the host shorter, lighter, and with maximum maneuverability.

The internal bore of the Nitro is cut for 9mm, and its all titanium construction makes it very light at ten ounces. The length of the suppressor is as much as 7.5 inches without removing the front portion, I found it to be more than adequate on pistol calibers without the front segment. The suppressor is rated for up to 308 Winchester rifle cartridges, which makes it an extremely versatile suppressor. It could be used with a QD break on your AR15, or it could go on your 9mm pistol using the booster and piston, or you could direct thread it to your 308 precision rifle. I have done all three and more! The front end cap is even designed to allow the use of suppressor wipes if you should choose to use them.

Unboxing the Nitro N20

My first impressions upon opening the box were how unbelievably light this suppressor felt in the hand. Its simple design and titanium construction make it as light if not lighter than most pistol cans, and it can be used on a rifle as well. The suppressor came with some paperwork and the tools required to disassemble it, I tossed them into my tool kit, and packed everything up for a range trip.

I opted for direct thread caps in two thread pitches because I planned on using this can on my hunting rifles due to its weight. But I also wanted to run it on my pistols, so I also got the booster and a Rugged piston. I was happy to find out that there are a multitude of manufacturers that make compatible pistons and other accessories for this and other suppressors. It may be the best idea yet, for all these suppressor companies to use standardized thread pitches so that end users can accommodate the mounting solutions that best fit their needs.

Nitro Rangetime

I literally could not wait to shoot the Nitro, having brought everything needed to test it out I went directly into the range after opening the box. I installed the booster and piston, and mounted the Nitro to my Canik TP9. After a couple test shots to ensure everything was inline, I started dumping rounds through the pistol. Both sub-sonic and super went through the Nitro, and boy could you tell the difference. Both types of ammo were very quiet, but I decided to remove the front section of the Nitro to see how much of a difference it made. To my surprise it was just as quiet in the shorter configuration, so I left it thus and continued banging away. Several trips into the field with the Nitro mounted to my pistol gave outstanding results, and I was in love immediately.  

I’d be lying if I told you I was already satisfied, I am a rifle junkie at heart, so I had to see how the Nitro performed on an assortment of rifles that I had in store. Most importantly, was my¬†257 Blackjack, which is my lightweight hunting rifle. The lightweight of the Nitro was a perfect match for this short action wildcat, with its carbon wrapped barrel and chassis. I also ran the Nitro on my 308 carbine and 6.5CM bolt gun, where it worked flawlessly and with hushed results. The Nitro is not full-auto rated, which is fine with me. But I don’t think I’d want to leave it on a carbine if shot duration is expected to be heavy. For pistols and bolt action rifles I think the Nitro is absolutely ideal, and it would be fine on a semi-auto as well, provided you have the self control to not cook it.¬†

The Nitro added a few inches to my Blackjack, but it also tamed it down quite nicely. The report was very manageable, it could be that I’m deaf but out in the open country of the mountains I found no need for ear protection. It also helped settle the rifle down upon recoil, making it easier to spot hits, and even helping tighten up the groups a bit.¬† the Nitro will definitely be on whatever rifle I take into the hunting woods this coming fall.

Nitro Gripes

It cant all be rainbows and sunshine every-time right? Well here are just a couple negatives I might add to the Nitro, but they are indeed minimal for at least this guy.

I found the finish on the Nitro to be not as robust as I expected, I don’t know if its a bake on finish or some other kind of material. But I found to be easier to scratch/chip than I would expect. I imagine YHM is aware of the situation, and since my suppressor is a very early production (single digit serial) I’d imagine they may have already corrected the issue. It’s not a huge deal to me, I frequently redo the Cerakote on my suppressors anyways. The other issue I have with the Nitro isn’t so much a YHM thing as it is a titanium thing. Titanium is easily galled or damaged when threading, and having three threading points on the Nitro make the possibility¬† of screwing something up more possible. This is of course a very minor concern, and I only mention it so that new owners are aware and avoid damaging it.

Overall Impression

If you cant tell already, I love this suppressor. It is still fairly new to me, but after a few months of good use, I still love almost everything about it. The Nitro fills a great place in the YHM lineup, and would make an excellent addition to any suppressor collection. It is only slightly more expensive on the street than some of its competition, and yet much lighter. 

Yankee Hill Machine continues to build quality products right here in America, and they are keeping a close eye on the market so their product lineup is in line with what people want to buy. I cant wait to get back on the firing line with the Nitro, and I’m excited to see what else the boys in Massachusetts come up with.

-CBM 

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