Sig Sauer Tango 6T 1-6

Low Power Variable Optics (LVPO’s) have been flooding through the firearm market for years now, likely due to the proliferation of medium-range carbines. It didn’t take long for shooters to realize the value of variable low power optics, but what makes an LVPO shine over another?

Sig Sauer has long been a big name in the firearms industry, I’ve been a big fan as long as I’ve been a gun owner. So it came as no surprise several years ago when Sig brought their own line of optics to market. What was a surprise, at least to me, was how invested I would get.

My first Sig optics was a Tango 6 5-30, a high powered riflescope with all of Sig Sauer’s bells and whistles. It has been a great scope for several years, and still enjoys its place on one of my favorite rifles.
What is the Tango 6T
Todays subject is about a newer generation Tango 6, the the Tango 6T which is a smaller Tango, a 1-6 Low Power Variable Optic. The 6T features Sig’s high quality and clear lenses for which they are well known. The 1-6 power 6T features a 30mm tube and a front focal plane 5.56 horseshoe ballistic reticle with illumination.
There are a couple different configurations for the 6T, the one I ordered came in FDE only. It also features a line lengthwise down the side of the tube, this eases the mounting of the scope by giving a reference point to evenly seat the scope in the rings. There also came a “cattail”, which is a clamp-on handle to give the user better purchase when trying to adjust the magnification setting.

I mounted the 6T in the Strike Industries ASM mount, an adjustable scope mount that can cantilever the optic out to several different positions. The ASM is a sexy looking companion for the Sig 6T.

After mounting the scope, it was time to zero it, an easy task using the finger adjustable turrets. When not in use the turrets are capped. I installed the CR2032 battery into the illumination turret and lit up the Horseshoe reticle. The 8 position rheostat has an off setting between each number, and also has a push-pull lock to avoid accidental adjustment.
On the Range
My first impression on the range was the image, my eyes were swept from their sockets by the crystal clear and bright image. I am more of a 1-8 fan than a 1-6, but this 1-6 is so beautiful I’d have a hard time turning it down for two more X’s. The 6T has parallax set to 150 meters, so shooting targets that are out there a little further is not a problem.
This was very convenient because I ran the 6T on two different rifles, both of which were very capable downrange performers. First it was mounted on the Armalite M-15 Comp Rifle, a match grade competition rifle built specifically for 3-gunning. I found the M-15 to be very accurate, and with the Tango 6T mounted on it, it was a near unstoppable setup. The low power setting of the Sig made up close targets easily and accurately engaged with both eyes open. And zooming in to 6X gave me enough magnification to pick out distant targets, and the Horseshoe reticle had very handy hold points for those distances.
I never expect ballistic reticles to match perfectly, its nearly impossible unless you are shooting the exact same ammunition in the exact same conditions as those who designed the reticle. The same goes for custom scope turrets, but the good news is that its pretty close. Modern flat shooting cartridges have a fairly similar trajectory so the drop points on the reticle are certainly close enough to be useful.

I also mounted the Sig 6T on my Desert Tech MDRX, which is a multi-caliber rifle. I shot it using both 223 and 6mm ARC barrels, both of which have been very accurate and have done well at various ranges. The 6T felt right at home on top of my MDRX, a much more compact rifle than the Armalite. Maneuvering around obstacles for shooting positions was much easier, and regardless of how close or far away the targets were, the Sig provided a beautiful sight picture with bright images. I keep bringing that up, but that may be the part I like the most about this scope, the optical clarity.

There is more to it than just optical clarity though, the engineers at Sig paid attention to so many little details. Little things like the texturing of control surfaces, high visibility green fiber optics markers around the magnification ring, and other little features that make you feel good about purchasing this scope.

The turrets of the 6T are .2 MRAD per click, which matches the MRAD reticle inside. The clicks are very clean and audible, and the grip surfaces inside the turrets are actually rubberized for easier grip whether using gloves or your bare fingers.

As far as the reticle itself, this might be one place where I wish they had put just a tiny bit more into it. Some people like a simple and clean reticle, while others like a reticle with many useful hold point to use. Being that I am a bit of a distance junkie, regardless of the rifle I’m using at the time, I find myself in the second camp. I like a reticle with plenty of hold-over positions to use and accompanying wind holds as well. While the reticle in the 6T is plenty useful, it wouldn’t have hurt my feelings to see a bit more detail to the reticle. That said, Sig also offers the 7.62 Extended Range reticle in this scope, which is better for that kind of shooting. I completely understand that most people might not need or care about this, and if you like just a few simple hold-over points, you will more than likely love this reticle.

Conclusion
In a market that is flush with many great options across nearly every price range, the Sig Sauer Tango 6T stands out as a spectacular LVPO. I think you would have to spend significantly more money to get a noticeably better scope with these same features. This while the 6T is significantly better looking than scopes that are only 10-20% less on the market. So at least in my opinion, it would be worth spending a little bit more to step up the Sig Sauer Tango 6T.

The Hornady 6mm ARC for the Desert Tech MDRX

It seems all too frequent nowadays for a new cartridge to jump to the front of every blog, magazine, and ad campaign.
Ammunition manufacturers are always looking for the next best thing to sell. I cant blame them, and I’d much prefer they spend all the money on R&D so the rest of us don’t have to.
At the top of the ammunition game is the big red H that we have all come to know quite well. Hornady has brought some extremely popular cartridges to market in the recent past, the PRC family comes to mind, as does the revered 6.5 Creedmoor.
The 6MM ARC
This year Hornady has again brought another impressive project to the shooting public, or at least legitimized an older one. The 6mm Advanced Rifle Cartridge (ARC) is that new product, and it looks to become as popular as it’s other red-tipped siblings.
The 6mm ARC is essentially a 6mm Grendel, but legitimized by Hornady’s production. It shares a few basic dimensions with the Grendel, but necked down to .243/6mm. It shoots heavy for caliber bullets in the 90-110 grain range, from a 7.5 twist barrel.
Hornady currently offers three different loads for the ARC, a 103 grain ELD-X in the Precision Hunter line, a 105 BTHP in the Black ammunition line, and a 108 grain ELD Match in their match ammunition line. In addition to these different ammunition lines, Hornady has also released loading dies, and components for loading the ARC.

Having seen many of these new cartridges come and go, I was cautiously optimistic for several reasons.
Just because it’s new doesn’t alway make it better, but I had long been considering a 6mm small frame AR cartridge like the Grendel or the 6mm Rat. The slightly larger bore of the 6mm gives a significant advantage over .224 caliber bullets, and if the velocity is there then you don’t have much to lose.
The MDRX

For those who dont already know, the MDRX is a multi-caliber ambidextrous bullpup rifle. Its closest peers are rifles like the Steyr AUG, the IWI X95 or T7, but the MDRX brings to the table a few more advantages. The MDRX will allow the use of both large and small frame cartridges, something the others will not do. Not only can the MDRX change between an assortment of calibers, but it can also be swapped in minutes with a single hex-key wrench. At the time of writing this, I have seven different barrels or conversion kits for my MDRX, they vary incredibly in their purpose and use. For cheap plinking, there is the traditional 223 (available in 16 or 20 inch barrels), for subsonic shooting there is the 16 inch 300Blk, for heavy thumping you can run the 308 Win (16 or 20 inch), and for distant shooting, you can run the 20 inch 6.5 Creedmoor. These four are available from the factory, I also have several custom barrels for my MDRX; the 450 Bushmaster brings devastating power to this tiny rifle. The 350 Legend is another that fits more of a niche hunting purpose, and today’s subject, the 6mm ARC is my latest addition to the collection. The 6 ARC brings inexpensive accuracy to the MDRX, it’s almost like a hybrid of my 223 barrel and 6.5 Creedmoor. It is inexpensive to load and shoot, has very negligible recoil, but shoots like a 6.5 Creedmoor as far as drop, and wind deflection. And the fact that it shoots so accurately makes this conversion kit perhaps my most favorite in the group, it rivals my SRS A1 as far as accuracy is concerned. Watch the video at the bottom of this article

So why the 6MM ARC?
Small frame autoloading rifles already have untold options when it comes to caliber, so what makes the ARC different? According to Hornady there are several reasons. The first one I’ll mention is performance, the ARC produces a similar if not superior ballistic curve than 308 Winchester. It maintains velocity and drop further than the 308 Win. It does this while showing off the second reason, efficiency. The ARC uses smaller, lighter cartridges with lighter powder charges to obtain this superior ballistic advantage. It also maintains a higher level of energy on target than it’s small frame competitors, the hundred-plus grain bullets carry a better energy load than your typical 69 to 90-grain bullets fired from AR’s. The overall load carried by a shooter or soldier is also less because of the ARC’s smaller size and weight when compared to larger cartridges like the 308. This reduction in weight, and powder charge also reduces the recoil felt by the shooter. This allows for rapid hit/miss confirmation and quick follow-up shots.

Accuracy
Of course, all this only matters if the ARC can shoot accurately. For me only accurate rifles are interesting, so I was happy to see how the ARC performed both on paper up close, and out at distance. The very first time I shot the 6 ARC at an actual range, I put three shots onto an IPSC target at 200 yards without even zeroing my scope.


After a little bit of research and some thought, I decided I would have an ARC of my own. Hornady shows a litany of manufacturers on their website that chamber rifles in the 6mm ARC, but I wanted to try something else.
My Desert Tech MDRX is a perfect candidate for a cartridge like the ARC, it is a multi-caliber platform that is easily adapted to large or small frame cartridges.
My good friend and talented gunsmith Eric at ES-Tactical got ahold of a quality 6mm barrel blank, and we set to working. The twenty-inch 7.5 twist barrel came from K&P, it was drilled, chambered, fluted, and threaded. With the appropriate barrel extension and gas block installed, all I needed was a bolt. The ARC uses a slightly larger bolt face than the 223, which took a little steady machining but worked perfectly. I also had to machine a little bit off of the 308 ejection chute clip in order to get it to firmly hold the smaller 6ARC cases.

The ARC runs at similar pressures to its peers, so I used the same gas settings as a 308 Winchester. And in a matter of a few minutes, the 6mm ARC roared to life.

Range trip
As I mentioned above, the first actual range trip for the ARC was impressive. The MDRX had been zeroed for my 223 barrel, but the POI was very close for the ARC. So close in fact, I shot 200, 450, and 550 yards without even zeroing the scope. Shooting standard size IPSC steel targets is not record breaking accuracy or anything, but it felt good right out of the gate.
Its fairly well known that the Grendel doesn’t like to feed well and doesn’t from 556 magazines, and the ARC shares that family trait. But I temporarily tried some P-mags until I got the proper magazines.  The 300BLK magazines worked better than 556 mags, but only if you loaded a few. I used a couple different magazines from Dura-Mag to avoid feeding issues. With these purpose-built magazines, you can load them up full, and have flawless function, like any other AR-type magazine.

ten and twenty round 6.5 Grendel magazines from Dura Mag worked flawlessly with the ARC

Recoil on the ARC is as Hornady suggested, minimal. Seeing your own hits on steel targets is easy at medium range, and even easier at long range.

A good five-shot group from the 6ARC at 100 yards

The accuracy of the ARC is superb, very likely due to the quality barrel and machining. But no doubt that the cartridges design also aids in keeping my groups together. Both factory Hornady match ammunition as well as my handloads performed well, producing groups that averaged around .5-.75 MOA and some of the best groups have been in the .3 to .4 MOA.
I was very impressed, it seemed to be the most consistent shooting barrel I have for this rifle. I was using my US Optics TS8X, which is significantly less magnification than I typically use when shooting groups. The RBR reticle is calibrated for 5.56 ammunition, but I figured it would be close with the 6 ARC. After shooting a few five-shot groups, I reached out to 300 yards across a canyon on a rock that was about ten inches wide. After hitting it over and over, I figured it was worth trying something further, but the only other target-sized rock I could find was at 960 yards. Not having a drop chart made yet, I did a little guestimating on my holdover. I was close, but shot over it with an 8 MRAD hold. So I dropped to 7 MRAD, and made a better windcall, and sent a second shot, which found my point of aim with nearly perfect precision. I was more than dazzled, as I continued to place shots on targets all over the mountain.

Loading the ARC
I’ve been handloading for many years, so loading the 6mm ARC was as simple as switching out some dies. The powder charges were pleasantly light, I used both CFE556 and BLC-2 for the ARC. Both performed well and provided good accuracy and consistency over CCI BR4 primers. I followed the load data that Hornady has available on their website, around 28 grains of powder was where I settled. The Hornady 105 grain BTHP was the bulk of my loading fodder, it is not too expensive, and performs very well. We have since used the ARC in a deadly encounter with some Wyoming antelope.

Conclusion
I’m usually slow to jump on new trends, it took me some time to pickup even the 6.5 Creedmoor. But this little cartridge has definitely piqued my interest, so much in fact I haven’t used any other barrels in my MDR since I got this one. Its accurate, smooth shooting, easy to spot hits and misses. And it hits targets pretty hard even at some significant distances, the only drawback I can even come up with is that I need to keep close tabs on the brass. Its a little more hard to come by than the average case, so I gotta keep an eye on them.


This awesome little cartridge is staying right close to me, we’ll be taking it hunting this fall for sure. And I don’t think it will be going away soon.
New things aren’t always better, but in the case of the 6MM ARC, I think Hornady has hit a 10X.

-CBM

Watch the viedo to see the 6 ARC MDRX in action

Sig Sauer Kilo 3000 BDX Binoculars

Every hunting or shooting trip has a list of essentials, and at the very top of that gear list you’ll find things such as guns and bullets. But for many of us, it’s not very far down that list that you’ll find binoculars and rangefinder. Today we are discussing the Sig Sauer Kilo 3000 binoculars, which bring the laser rangefinder and binoculars onto the same line.


The Sig Sauer Kilo 3000
The Kilo 3000 binoculars sit at the top of the Kilo optics line, which is a series of great laser range finders. The Kilo is built on a 10X42mm body, with a built in LRF that claims up to 5000 yard capability. The armored exterior of the Kilo holds a few more secrets inside than most.
The Kilo also features Sig Sauer’s BDX technology, which allows the Kilo to communicate via bluetooth with other devices. Using data inputs from weather stations like the Kestrel Weather Meter to give accurate ballistic solutions. The Kilo uses the Applied Ballistics solver to give the shooter the best prediction for a hit. This system can be used in conjunction with Sig Sauer scopes that use the same system to show holdover and wind holds in live time with illuminative points on the reticle.
The Kilo uses a single CR2 lithium battery to power it, according to Sig, this will give you approximately 4,000 chances to measure the distance to your targets.
The Kilo weighs in at 31 ounces which is almost the exact same weight as is nearest competitors.

On the range
The vast expanse of the Rocky Mountains is the perfect place to put a rangefinder to the test, and I spend a couple days every week shooting in these beautiful landscapes. So no sooner had I gotten home with the Kilo, I grabbed my rifle and gear bag and headed up one of my favorite trails. Before I left though, I put together the chest harness that comes with the Kilo so I could hike with both hands free.

I have used quite a few different binocular chest carry outfits, and for the most part I think it is very subjective as to how comfortable they are. This one for me was not too bad, I like how quick it is to bring the binos out of the case. Both the case itself and the binoculars are suspended from the shoulder straps individually, and the bino straps are easily snapped free if you need to disconnect them to lend to a less fortunate spotting partner.

After a good sweat from the hot August sun, I found myself looking out across a steep canyon that worked its way back into the rocky and cavernous mountain range. It was a place I frequent fairly often so I already knew a lot of the distances available to me. I sat down and began to scan with the Kilo, my very first impression of the image quality was positive. I have used many of the popular brands of LRF binos, and I would put the optical quality of the Sig Kilo right near the top of its price point class. It is similar to models from Vortex, Nikon, and Leupold in the same price range. Perhaps a little better than some, but not quite as nice as the top quality optics we are accustomed to seeing from European manufacturers like Swarovski or Leica. One thing that I did find more convenient was that when using other binos I find that I frequently have to adjust the focus between my eyes to get a uniform image. But with the Kilo I found that I adjusted it once, and never touched it again, perhaps that’s a small issue but for me its almost reason enough to sell my other binos.

Like most modern binoculars, the Kilo 3000 feature adjustable eyecups to set the lenses the right distance from your eyes. And like the entire exterior of the binoculars, these are rubberized for easy grip, the control surfaces of the binoculars have an added texture as well for easy manipulation.

The laser dispersion of the Kilo was one thing I wanted to see and test, after all, a good rangefinder is only as good as its ability to precisely confirm distance. This can become very important when ranging a target that might be very close to obstructions along the way, such as a tree branch, or a ridge between you and the target.
Keeping the Kilo firmly fixed to a tripod, I measured the distance to several targets that had surrounding obstructions. I was happy to see that almost anything that was inside the reticle of the Kilo registered the actual distance. But even something as insignificant as a leaf 380 yards away that obstructed the view of a 950 yard target, was picked up by the laser. Ranging targets eclipsed the edge of a closer ridge only gave interference when the reticle overlapped the closer ridge. All things considered, the Kilo’s laser gives a very accurate and predictable measurement, so when the range comes back, you know what it reflected on.

The rangefinding capabilities of the Kilo were more than adequate for my purposes. Ive found that most rangefinders are rated for distances at the extreme envelope of their capabilities. The better quality, and usually the higher the price point, I find they come closer to their maximum range rating. Sig claims the Kilo can hit 5000 yards, which may be true. But I couldn’t hold still enough or hit a reflective enough target to read that far. It did work great inside of 2000 yards however, giving quick and repeatable readings. Whether it was rocks, or trees, dimly shadowed or glowing in the afternoon sun.
I did push it out quite a bit further, ranging buildings back down in town from my 6000 foot perch. Cars and buildings were good reflectors out to around 3000 yards, I have since gotten good readings on large reflective targets as far as 4800 yards.

I used the Kilo both in its range only setting as well as with the incline output setting, I would have liked to try out the bluetooth BDX functions as well. But that would have required me buying a whole scope to go with it, something Im not ready to do at the moment but I would really like to give the whole system a complete workout.

Conclusion
The Kilo 3000 is yet another awesome product from the elctro-optic branch of Sig Sauer. I think if you are looking for a good pair of hunting binos, you’d do very well with these. Having used many of its closest peers, I’d probably pick the Kilo over them.
-CBM

Pronghorns and Prodigy Hunting

If you’ve followed me for very long at all, you must know by now that hunting is my greatest passion. Its become a way of life around my house, and sharing it with loved ones brings me the greatest satisfaction. That said, the hunting lifestyle doesn’t always enjoy the positive public reflection it once did. A great fear of mine is the loss of our hunting opportunities due to the growing anti-hunting sentiment around the world.
I have worked diligently over the years to effect what I think is the silver bullet to that argument; getting more new hunters addicted to this incredibly rewarding lifestyle.

Today’s story is about my latest efforts, and how patience and love created both a new hunter, and a whole new family bond.

Watch the video at the end of this article

Pre-season practice

Last year I convinced my wife to get her hunters safety, she grew up in a non-hunting family and environment which made it unnecessary. She made short work of the class, and last fall was her first time to ever go hunting with me carrying a rifle and a tag in her pocket. Unfortunately she never got a shot despite her valiant effort and hard work.

Fast forward to September 2020, and again we prepared for The hunt. This year she was lucky enough to draw a pair of Wyoming doe antelope tags, one of my favorite hunts precisely for new hunters like her.
We prepared all the gear we would need, and set out well before sunrise to get into a good position to spot animals as the sun came up.
Typically from experience, Pronghorn (their proper name) aren’t hard to find in Wyoming, they tend to begin activity after sunrise, keeping their sharp eyes on anything that moves on the wide open plains they inhabit.
After looking over several rolling brush covered valleys, we spotted a small group of antelope on the edge of the next rise. Trying to cover distance quietly and quickly can be a challenge with a new hunter, but Mrs. Coldboremiracle was keen to follow and do all the right things. We soon found ourselves on a windswept rise, looking in the direction the antelope had gone. The wind howled and gusted as we glassed the area, we quickly picked out the bright white sides of the herd. The smaller group had just joined a larger one, probably twenty-five animals. A few bucks, does, and a bunch of fawns.
We hunkered down, out of sight, even though they were nearly half a mile away they would easily spot us and sprint into the next county if we weren’t careful. We surveyed the whole area, and decided to try and put a stalk on the large group. Normally that many eyeballs is not a great choice to try and put a sneak on, but we had a line of cedar trees between us. We discussed the other options, and the idea of using the trees for concealment to get closer seemed like the best option.

The weapon of choice that day was my 257 Blackjack custom, a SAUM based wildcat shooting the Blackjack Bullets 131 grain Ace. It is a ballistic gem, providing extremely flat trajectories, and ignores the wind as much as any bullet can.

The 257 Blackjack aka “The Pitboss” Build details at the bottom

With rifle in her hands, we snuck down into a wash and towards the line of trees. Stopping to look at the herd every few steps to see if we’d been spotted yet. I breathed a sigh of relief as we finally made it behind the first tree, giving us the concealment the open prairie would not. The wind continued to gust, it felt like anywhere between 10 and 25 miles per hour. The noise of the wind gave us plenty of sound cover, all we had to do was stay out of sight within the trees as we worked towards a spot we could get a good shot.
We worked our way south, with the wind blowing hard in our faces. After about four hundred yards of sneaking, the trees began to thin, and we could see the herd slightly above us and four-hundred-fifty yards away. After confirming that we had not been detected, we crawled around to the shady side of the last small cedar that would give us cover. While I watched through the spotter, She crawled out onto her belly on the soft grey dirt behind the Blackjack. With the distance confirmed, and everything in position it was time to get noisy.

The sixth-sense that animals have must have been working hard that morning. First one, then several others looked straight at us, perhaps having seen some of our final movements. Their body language was concerned, but not spooked. So we focused our attention on a mature doe who stood out from the group. She was quickly obscured by the group however, a challenging aspect of these animals. They ball up in a group making it difficult To get a clean shot.
We ended up having to shift focus to another doe, who stepped slightly out of the group facing the opposite direction. It had only been maybe thirty or forty-seconds since we got into position, but the buck in the group began herding them towards the next rise. Clearly they knew something was up, I told Mrs. Miracle that it was now or never. The buck was moving towards her at the back of the group to push them over the hill and out of sight. So with her heart pounding and the wind whistling by, she pressed the trigger.
The 257 Blackjack runs just over 3200 feet per second, its blistering speed matches its flat trajectory. The 131 grain Ace zipped through the doe in less than half a second, with over 2300 pounds of energy the bullet was probably still dry as it hit the powdered dirt behind her.
The whole herd scattered from the impact, but our doe had been pointed the opposite direction from the rest. She ran about fifty-yards, before she slowed down, and began to stumble. She laid down and her head swayed before keeling over in the dry prickly brush. The rest of the herd stood in the distance, apparently waiting for her to catch up.
Back at our shooting position it was all smiles and excitement, we quickly packed up and began the walk towards our prize.

The Ace had passed just behind the shoulders, perhaps a little higher than one might recommend, but it worked out to be perfect. It passed through without even touching a bone, so almost zero meat was lost from the shot, a perfect double lung shot.

We took pictures, and savored the moment before cleaning her up, and transporting her back to the truck. I remember on several occasions during the stalk, as well as in the final moment before the shot, I had to remind myself that this was a new hunter. The perspective of a new hunter is not the same as an old hand, it requires a little bit of discipline.

Keeping the moment fun, and trying to suspend the pressure as much as you can, will make the experience more fun for those that are new to it. Keeping calm is tough for me, I get wound up pretty tight in the heat of a hunt. But I found that staying calm, and ensuring that she was comfortable and ready made it a better experience for everyone.
As we returned home with her prize, we spoke about it. She is already excited for our Mule Deer hunt that starts in a few weeks, and next years antelope hunt. It is possible, that I’ve hooked her for life now, all according to my plan…

-CBM

Pit Boss Build Specs
-Remington 700 SA
-Proof Research Carbon 7.5 Twist 25 cal 24″
-US Optics Foundation 25X JVCR
-IOTA Carbon Fiber Stock
-Hawkins Precision Bottom Metal SA AI
-Trigger Tech Diamond Flat Shoe
-Blackjack Bullets 131 Grain Ace
-Machine Work done at ES-Tactical

Area 419 ARCALOCK Dovetail Rail

Can I start out by just saying how I love American ingenuity? I am constantly presented with impressive new products from an untold well of small business’ that push the envelope. Today that product is from Area 419, some of you will be quite familiar with their products and for those that aren’t, prepare yourselves for fresh lust.
see video below
Area 419 is a precision rifle shooters wet dream, they produce custom rifles, precision loading equipment, muzzle brakes, suppressors and more. Its all done with top tier industry standards, and has kept 419 at the top of their game for some time.

As much as I’d like to evangelize the entirety of their products, today I must focus on one product in particular. The ARCALOCK rail system is Area 419’s proprietary version of the impressive and popular ARCA rail. The ARCA has become the go to accessory rail for precision rifle shooters in PRS and NRL style shooting. The 1.5 inch wide rail allows shooters an impressive host of rifle supporting equipment, it allows quick attachment and adjustment of bipods, clamps, bags, tripods and more.

The ARCALOCK system made by Area 419 features a serration like edge, with tiny radii down both sides. The ARCALOCK clamps that go with it have three hard steel pins that engage the serrations when tightened down. It does this while still retaining the reciprocal use of standard ARCA products from other manufacturers as well. The augmented engagement of the ARCALOCK system allows shooters to quickly and securely install and adjust their rifle support hardware.

It may look like a measuring device for small fish, but the index marks are simply reference points for the shooter.

How it works
The ARCALOCK rail attaches via machine screws to the bottom of your rifle chassis, it is available in various lengths to fit most rifles. It has a long slot down the center line to take advantage of most any attachment point. The dove tail of all ARCA rails give a broad clamping surface, with lots of surface contact. The added benefit of the ARCALOCK system is that with the clamp lugs engaging the rail, there is a mechanical engagement in addition to the clamping, which will reduce wear. Also in my experience, the ARCALOCK’s additional engagement translates into lower torque required to firmly secure your clamped on accessories.
I decided to install the ARCALOCK rail on my 25 Creedmoor, which uses the KRG Bravo chassis. The rifle is a perfect candidate for the rail, and I’ve wanted to add something like this to it since I first got it.
Once installed, I was immediately intrigued with its use. I played with both a Harris and an Atlas bipod that had been fitted with 419’s ARCALOCK clamp. The clamp is easily attached to the Atlas with two screws, the Harris does require an adaptor that Area 419 produces that only improves the mounting and use of it in my opinion.

It mounted up neatly in my tripod, which gave my rifle a firm foundation that locks up so tight it feels like you could stand on it.

My Cole-TAC Support bag attaches to the ARCALOCK perfectly for shooting from barricades or rocks. There are many other accessories made by Area 419 like barricade stops, weights, and bag riders. These all clamp right onto the rail, giving the shooter an impressive amount of support.

Conclusion
As I stated at the opening of this article, I am constantly impressed by so many great ideas that good people like those at Area 419. Simple yet brilliant solutions to advance our shooting sports.
After shooting just a short time with the ARCALOCK system, I find myself wanting to add it to all of my rifles. I don’t shoot as many matches as I used to, but I can see how this system would add trigger-time to the clock. Together with all the available accessories, it will absolutely help you stabilize your rifle, through transitions of all sorts.
I wouldn’t be surprised if this system continues to see proliferation, and offered as OE from precision rifle companies.
In the meantime, I think I may have to get a few more of these for my other rifles, because good rifles should be spoiled.
-CBM