Tag Archives: titanium

CGS Group Hyperion K suppressor

You cant swing a dead cat in my house without hitting a good suppressor, I suppose you could say I am a bit of an addict. No it isn’t because I like to keep ATF agents employed, nor do I enjoy collecting stamps, I just love shooting suppressed. My rights were first violated over twenty years ago now, and it has only gotten worse with time, both the violation and the addiction to cans.
Today I wanted to tell you all about the latest suppressor I was able to get hands on, the CGS Group Hyperion K. I have seen them all over on social media and gun-tubers channels, but I had yet to put any ammo through one. As you might imagine I jumped at the chance.


The Hyperion
According to CGS, the Hyperion utilizes a proprietary technology to manufacture and heat treat this all grade 5 titanium suppressor. It is the product of 3D printing using the direct metal laser sintered (DMLS) process, using a laser fired into a bed of titanium powder to melt it into the pattern of their design. This alone sounds like an amazingly complicated and expensive process, but I’m just a dummy who swings hammers and gets greasy. What I can tell you, is that the result of this process has created one of the cleanest looking cans I’ve seen. The curious design and textures of this suppressor make it aesthetically pleasing and more importantly extremely light. The Hyperion senior weighs in at fifteen ounces, and this K model is even lighter at 10.5 ounces.
The back of the can is threaded 5/8-24, and also features a tapered opening to use CGS’s proprietary mounts. I would also assume that if you had a tapered muzzle to the same angle it would help there as well. The technology with which these suppressors are manufactured make them very durable according to the manufacturer, with higher ratings than expected, and increased durability rating as well. The Hyperion K has special boron nitride coating inside that helps reduce fouling inside the suppressor, and the outside has very attractive and durable DLC coating.

The Hyperion K (rear) shown next to a comparable titanium suppressor

Welcome to the Fam
I tucked the Hyperion K into my bag with a few other suppressors, and I retreated to my mountain hide. I planned on shooting the Hyperion on rifles I was already very familiar with, as well as how they react to suppressors. The first rifle and the primary one I was to introduce to the Hyperion was my Desert Tech SRS M2, the SRS is a multi-caliber precision rifle. There are untold possibilities as far as custom calibers, but at the moment I probably have over a dozen different caliber conversions for this rifle. Today on this particular range trip I had installed my 6mm GT conversion kit, which has become one of my favorites. Seeing as how the Hyperion is rated for much larger calibers, I expected it to work very well on this configuration. I have shot this same barrel with half a dozen other suppressors, so I was prepared to feel and hear something different.
Upon installing the Hyperion I did notice one little thing that concerned me. The tapered breech of the threads resulted in the threads starting approximately two to three tenths of an inch farther into the suppressor. The result obviously is that there is less thread engagement than a non-tapered thread cap. I suppose this could be a much bigger concern if you were running the suppressor on a larger rifle such as the 300RUM it is max rated for. But I felt there was enough thread engagement to be safe, so I started sending rounds.

The Hyperion K mounted on my Desert Tech SRS M2 6mm GT

The Sound
When I first broke the trigger, I was more focused on making sure the can was still there, something that comes when trying a new can on most any host. The second shot I was definitely paying more attention, and I did notice the difference from what I usually hear. The Hyperion does an excellent job at suppressing the noise, and it almost seems to have a lower tone than many of my other cans. I guess you could say its not as “hissy” as most cans, and has a bit deeper tone.
After a couple rounds I decided to start burning through some ammo, mainly because I love that damn GT and hitting things with it. The Hyperion stayed right where I’d put it, and after about twenty rounds fired over the course of a few minutes as far away as twelve-hundred yards it was definitely warm to the touch. But as titanium does, it cooled down very quickly, especially in the cold Rocky Mountain breeze.

The Hyperion K performed flawlessly, with very pleasing results on various firearms

In a very short time the can was easily handled, so I removed it and swapped it over to my Bergara BMP 6.5 Creedmoor. Certainly not a huge step up in case volume and powder charge, but it was a step up. The Hyperion sounded very nice on the twenty-four inch Bergara as well, I have shot a couple other comparable titanium suppressors on these rifles and I just like the sound the Hyperion makes a little more. It became quite apparent that would need some serious firepower in order to make this suppressor really sweat, something I wasn’t real keen to do, but I figured you guys wouldn’t be happy if I didn’t.
I would have loved to try out CGS’s vented low profile front cap, it has additional ports to allow more gas to bypass. This would have been ideal to use on a semi-auto rifle, as it would likely reduce the gas backpressure coming at the shooter.

The breech of the Hyperion K, note taper

I figured I’d so a couple good twenty round mag dumps with a 308 to get it hot, and see how the Hyperion reacts. The semi-auto rating of the Hyperion made me quite confident that nothing I was about to do was going to hurt it. After forty-rounds of 308 Winchester the can was smoking hot, so I figured one more was in order. A whole lot of heat could be seen, but the sound still sounded about the same. I have to assume it began to lose some of its effectiveness as the can got hotter and hotter, but it still was very pleasing to my ears.

Thoughts
I prefer shooting precision rifles over high volume fighting guns, so keep that in mind as I write this. The Hyperion K offers a shorter length than most full size rifle cans, and yet it seems to be quieter. I have both brake mounted and direct thread cans, I typically prefer the later so it should come as no surprise that this Hyperion fits squarely in my near perfect solution. It has lightweight, short length, and superior suppression power over most. Durability with full-auto ratings is nice to have, and I’m sure to many people that is important, but to me not so much. I am fine with the Hyperion not being full-auto rated.
The only thing about this can I didn’t like was the shorter threads, something I think I could easily overcome. I don’t like shooting big bastard magnums that often anyways, so it is of little concern. The back of the threads spun up snug and perfectly square to all my barrels.

I am mystified by the special technology they are weaving over at CGS Group, but it sure seems like they are onto something. If this Hyperion is any indicator, I think I may need to look into additional offerings to see if I’ve been missing out on anything else. I know I may be just a nobody, but the CGS Group Hyperion K is definitely worth looking at if you are in the market.

-CBM