Tag Archives: 6.5 creedmoor

Savage 110 6.5 Creedmoor

One of my first loves was an old savage 10FP in 308. It had all the simplicity a guy could want, and it just plain shot. I have had a bunch of Savages over the years, and I have typically had a pretty good experience with them. So when the opportunity to shoot a newer version of the model 10/110 I was eager to see how it compared to the old FP I loved so much.

My old Savage 10FP from almost twenty years ago

Savage has been around for a long time, and they have made quite a few guns in that time. One of my initial concerns with this rifle in particular was if it stood up to the classic Savages that I’ve shot over the years, I would find out soon enough.

The Model 110

The 110 action has changed through several different generations over the decades, but this current 6.5 Creedmoor model is not too different from those of the past. Like most Savage actions, is is machined from round stock with a front and rear ring. The two lug bolt rotates the floating head into the front ring of the action, and the twenty-four inch eight-twist barrel is threaded into the front of the action. The recoil lug is sandwiched there, and the whole assembly held together with a barrel nut. At the rear of the action the safety and Accu-Trigger are attached, and the whole thing is set into the polymer stock. I’ve never been a big fan of the cheap plastic stocks on economy priced rifles, but some of the few that were despicable in my eyes have been Savages such as this one. On the bottom of the polymer stock, there is a detachable box magazine that holds three cartridges.
This model is obviously marketed as a hunting rifle, it’s weight and profile features are optimized for a hunter. That being the case I wasn’t surprised by some of the features, or a lack of others. I guess you could say that in my estimation this was a basic no-frills hunting rifle.

Outfitting

Being a hunting rifle, I wanted to setup the rifle the way I would use it. The open Rocky Mountains where I hunt are full of big spaces, and shots can be had from archery range to as far as you’d dare pull a trigger. I decided to mount my Gen 1 Vortex PST 4-16, perhaps a little old school for todays market, but these older scopes always worked great for me. I actually got one of the very first ones that came out, serial number four. I mounted the scope in a pair of Warne rings, and bore-sighted it on my kitchen counter. I attached a bipod for convenience and accuracy testing, and lubed up the action before heading out to shoot.

I wanted to give the Savage a few different ammunition options to see how it performed. Some rifles are pretty picky when it comes to shooting accurately with any given ammo, so I wanted to have as many options for success as possible. The current situation at the ammo isle is pretty sad still, I have managed to find a bunch of stuff lately but the 6.5CM is still not as common as it once was. That being the case I decide to shoot a few of the factory options I had available, as well as some of my most common handloads that have done well in my other 6.5’s. Continue Reading Here…

an average five shot group from the Savage 110

Conclusion

Bergara BMP 6.5 Creedmoor

The Remington 700 rifle has been for many years a prominent stalwart in the precision rifle world. The strong aftermarket support that has accompanied the 700’s time in the sunshine has also made it a very desirable platform for custom rifle building, and the 700 footprint has been copied and cloned by many in order to take advantage of that aftermarket.
One of the many companies that has done exactly that is Bergara, and today we are talking about one of the rifles they manufacture.


The Bergara BMP 6.5 Creedmoor

The Bergara Match Precision (BMP) is a short action rifle designed and built for competition. There are all kinds of accessories and features that make a good match gun, and Bergara certainly included many of them here.
At the core of the rifle is Bergara’s B-14 two lug action, it uses a sliding front extractor and a traditional plunger ejector. The bolt nose and breech is tapered, and the assembly slides very smoothly in the action. The front of the action has a very cunning cutout to capture the recoil lug, and keep it centered. In front of that is a twenty-four inch match grade barrel made by Bergara, and threaded 5/8-24 at the muzzle. The model I tested here came with a very nice user indexable muzzle brake, which works very well to reduce recoil. The B-14 utilizes Remington 700 accessories like scope-base rails, which made mounting my scope easy.

Details: Captured recoil lug, bolt catch, trigger adjustments, chassis detail

The second half of the rifle is the BMP chassis. We live in a chassis world now, almost every manufacturer has their own version of a chassis gun. I think Bergara did pretty good with theirs, it incorporates most of the important features a shooter would want.
Built from aluminum, the BMP chassis is not particularly light at 10.4 pounds, but most match guns aren’t light so that’s fine by me. Let’s start at the butt of the chassis and move forward.
The recoil pad is made of hard rubber, and is quickly indexed by loosening a thumbscrew just in front of it. There is very rough rubber like surface between the butt-pad and the rear face of the stock, this allows the butt-pad to be easily fit to the shooter and maintain solid lockup with minimal torque. Just in front of that is the length of pull adjustment, which is easily done by loosening a wingnut on the butt-stock to adjust to your liking. Then it is easily snugged back up for a solid feel. The adjustable cheek-piece is adjusted the same way using an identical wingnut to release the cheek-piece to be adjusted to your scope height. The whole process of fitting the chassis to my taste took only a few moments and zero trips to the owners manual.

Moving forward on the chassis is the pistol-grip, the model I have came with a vertical MDT adjustable grip. Many people don’t care for the vertical grip, but they are wrong in my opinion. The precise adjustability of the MDT allows for perfect trigger finger placement and pull.
The adjustable trigger of the BMP felt perfect just the way it came, I felt no need to adjust it any lighter, even though that is what I usually do. At the front of the trigger guard is the wide magazine release for dropping free the AICS type magazines, the rifle came with the Magpul version which I quite like. The slippery polymer seems to allow smoother feeding than some metal magazines. The fit of the magazines seemed just a bit looser than I would expect, but at no time during my testing did they malfunction or fall out, so I guess they are perfectly fine.
The forearm of the chassis features MLok slots on all the right spots, which allows users to add and adjust any accessories they feel necessary. There are also steel insert flush cups to quickly install and remove your sling, there are correlating flush cups on the rear of the butt-stock as well. The top of the forearm seems to be drilled and tapped for a night vision optics bridge, which I was unfortunately unable to use.

Like a Glove
There were few things I felt needed to add to the BMP, but I did have to install one of my favorite accessories which is the Area419 ARCALock rail on the bottom of the forearm. On top of the rifle I mounted up one of my nicer scopes, deserving of a ride on the BMP was the Kahles 3-18X56. It was a perfect fit for the rifle, and after sliding on my Atlas Bipod I grabbed some ammo and headed for the hills.

Continue Reading Here…

The Ruger RPR 6.5 Creedmoor

The RPR took the precision rifle world for quite a ride when it first came out. Ruger made an excellent move by introducing an affordable rifle into an arena that was dominated by expensive custom built rifles and actual sniper rifles. And in another stroke of genius they managed to make a rifle that appealed to the AR 15 crowd at the same time, which brought even more customers into their fold.

The RPR
The Ruger Precision Rifle utilizes a bolt action receiver that is built into a chassis. It is fed by SR-25 pattern 308 sized P-mags for the 308, 6mm, and 6.5 chambered rifles. The rifle seems to almost clone the aesthetics of the extremely popular AR 15, using the same pistol grip, and similar operation for the safety. The model I have also includes a folding butt stock for shortening the footprint of the rifle when transporting. The twenty-four inch hammer forged barrel uses 5R rifling which if you ask the internet is the only good kind of rifling. The one in eight twist barrel is ideal for launching the heavy for caliber bullets that many long range shooters prefer. The ten and a half pound rifle is about forty-five inches long unless you fold it, in which case it is thirty-five inches long.

Try It

Having been one of those in the community with a preference for the custom built rifle, it took me some time to actually give the Ruger a try. To be honest I did look down at it a bit, perhaps like many others I was angry that it shot just as good as rifles that cost twice as much or more.
But it didn’t take long for the RPR to prove its worth to those in the community, and now a days its common to see them shooting at top PRS events. I shot in the Hornady Precision Rifle Challenge this past summer and saw several RPR’s including Doug Koenig who did extremely well shooting with significantly more expensive competitors, taking home the top Production Rifle trophy.

I figured it was time for me to open up to the Ruger, so I took the opportunity when it came. I opened up the box, to find the all black rifle complete with a magazine, bipod and a few other items. I took a few minutes to familiarize myself with the rifle, and get a feel for the controls and such. For me there are couple things that stand out when first handling a rifle, the first one is throwing the bolt. I shouldered the rifle and ran the bolt a few times, you can tell a lot about a rifle by the feel of the bolt-throw. The Ruger was smooth and had a positive lockup feel when closed into battery, you could also feel a metal on plastic sensation a little bit which I assumed to be the piece at the rear of the bolt. Not that there was anything negative about it, as plastic on metal frequently gives a low-friction feeling which I do like. The bolt lift was not bad, but did take a little bit of getting used to. Not bad, obviously not as good as some of the other rifle actions frequently used today.
The next feature that seals the deal for me is the trigger pull. I don’t consider myself a trigger snob but I do enjoy a perfect trigger whenever I can. The trigger on the RPR was a good one, clean and without the abrasive skipping often felt on triggers of lower tiered firearms. I’ve never been a big fan of blade safeties, when they first came out many years ago, the first thing I did was figure out how to remove them. That being said I wasn’t so hateful of this one to look for a way to remove it.
The main safety was in the same place your traditional AR style rifle safety goes, which made it very convenient and familiar to use. It wouldn’t hurt my feelings if they put it on both sides like AR’s often do, but certainly not a deal breaker. The RPR runs on 308 sized P-Mags, and it came with a ten-round magazine. I would later try the twenty-round ones as well, just in case you ever needed to do some long strings of fire.
The folding buttstock of the rifle made it much shorter for transportation, and doubled as a quick way to remove the bolt for inspection, lube, or cleaning. Up front we had the hammer-forged twenty-four inch barrel inside a free-floated handguard. The muzzle of the barrel is threaded 5/8-24, which was great because I planned on mounting some stuff there.
The handguard on my particular rifle uses KeyMod for accessory attachment, but they are also available in the more modern and useful M-Lok. I secured the Atlas bipod to the pic rail underneath, and then I was ready to mount up a riflescope. Continue Reading Here…

A good rifle deserves an even better scope

rifle details; notice QD sling cup behind the grip, and locking mechanism for folding stock just above it

Browning X-Bolt Hells Canyon 6.5 Creedmoor

When I first saw the Browning X-bolt Hell’s Canyon at SHOT Show, I remember thinking to myself that many folks were going to eat it up. And as years have passed it surely has become one of the most talked about hunting rifles out there. So when I finally got a chance to check it out myself, I was eager to see if all the hype was well founded. I had already been playing with a different X-bolt model, so I was pretty familiar with it before I even opened the box. What I didn’t realize was just how deep into Hell’s Canyon I would descend.

First Impression
My very first impression of the rifle was not unlike my feeling when I saw it at SHOT Show, it was just a plain handsome rifle. A bronze colored Cerakote job and similar A-TACS camo pattern clearly sets this rifle apart on the rifle rack. The fluted barrel and it’s inconspicuous muzzle brake flow seamlessly into the receiver, all of which is set nicely into the camouflaged composite stock. A nice soft recoil pad at the back was a welcome feature, as was the detachable box magazine. And like other X-bolts I’ve shot, it was just smooth. The sixty-degree bolt design makes shorter and faster operation, and the gold-plated trigger breaks as clean as most any hunting rifle I’ve ever pulled from a shelf. The X Bolt action features a bolt release button to unlock the bolt when the safety is on, a very cunning and intuitive design. If this rifle shot as good as it looked, I was going be hard pressed to let go of it.

Setup
I wanted to get straight to the range with this rifle, but first I had to get a scope mounted. I went with a one-piece scope base that uses eight screws to hold it down to the top of the receiver. I found this to be a superior mounting system than the traditional four screws that most manufacturers use to mount scope bases.

I tried a couple different mounting systems and riflescopes, first a Nikon 4-16 scope which worked great, but was too high. I ended up with the system that seemed to work the best, a Crimson Trace 3-12 mounted in Warne rings and bases.
I had a small amount of Hornady American Gunner 6.5CM ammo that I could test in the rifle, but I wanted to try more than one thing just in case the rifle didn’t care for it. So I sat at my loading bench to crank out another couple options hoping at least one of them would provide me with the exceptional accuracy I was hoping for. After that, I installed a Harris bipod so I could get this rifle into the field and shooting.

Continue Reading Here…