Tag Archives: tango 6

Sig Sauer Tango 6T 1-6

Low Power Variable Optics (LVPO’s) have been flooding through the firearm market for years now, likely due to the proliferation of medium-range carbines. It didn’t take long for shooters to realize the value of variable low power optics, but what makes an LVPO shine over another?

Sig Sauer has long been a big name in the firearms industry, I’ve been a big fan as long as I’ve been a gun owner. So it came as no surprise several years ago when Sig brought their own line of optics to market. What was a surprise, at least to me, was how invested I would get.

My first Sig optics was a Tango 6 5-30, a high powered riflescope with all of Sig Sauer’s bells and whistles. It has been a great scope for several years, and still enjoys its place on one of my favorite rifles.
What is the Tango 6T
Todays subject is about a newer generation Tango 6, the the Tango 6T which is a smaller Tango, a 1-6 Low Power Variable Optic. The 6T features Sig’s high quality and clear lenses for which they are well known. The 1-6 power 6T features a 30mm tube and a front focal plane 5.56 horseshoe ballistic reticle with illumination.
There are a couple different configurations for the 6T, the one I ordered came in FDE only. It also features a line lengthwise down the side of the tube, this eases the mounting of the scope by giving a reference point to evenly seat the scope in the rings. There also came a “cattail”, which is a clamp-on handle to give the user better purchase when trying to adjust the magnification setting.

I mounted the 6T in the Strike Industries ASM mount, an adjustable scope mount that can cantilever the optic out to several different positions. The ASM is a sexy looking companion for the Sig 6T.

After mounting the scope, it was time to zero it, an easy task using the finger adjustable turrets. When not in use the turrets are capped. I installed the CR2032 battery into the illumination turret and lit up the Horseshoe reticle. The 8 position rheostat has an off setting between each number, and also has a push-pull lock to avoid accidental adjustment.
On the Range
My first impression on the range was the image, my eyes were swept from their sockets by the crystal clear and bright image. I am more of a 1-8 fan than a 1-6, but this 1-6 is so beautiful I’d have a hard time turning it down for two more X’s. The 6T has parallax set to 150 meters, so shooting targets that are out there a little further is not a problem.
This was very convenient because I ran the 6T on two different rifles, both of which were very capable downrange performers. First it was mounted on the Armalite M-15 Comp Rifle, a match grade competition rifle built specifically for 3-gunning. I found the M-15 to be very accurate, and with the Tango 6T mounted on it, it was a near unstoppable setup. The low power setting of the Sig made up close targets easily and accurately engaged with both eyes open. And zooming in to 6X gave me enough magnification to pick out distant targets, and the Horseshoe reticle had very handy hold points for those distances.
I never expect ballistic reticles to match perfectly, its nearly impossible unless you are shooting the exact same ammunition in the exact same conditions as those who designed the reticle. The same goes for custom scope turrets, but the good news is that its pretty close. Modern flat shooting cartridges have a fairly similar trajectory so the drop points on the reticle are certainly close enough to be useful.

I also mounted the Sig 6T on my Desert Tech MDRX, which is a multi-caliber rifle. I shot it using both 223 and 6mm ARC barrels, both of which have been very accurate and have done well at various ranges. The 6T felt right at home on top of my MDRX, a much more compact rifle than the Armalite. Maneuvering around obstacles for shooting positions was much easier, and regardless of how close or far away the targets were, the Sig provided a beautiful sight picture with bright images. I keep bringing that up, but that may be the part I like the most about this scope, the optical clarity.

There is more to it than just optical clarity though, the engineers at Sig paid attention to so many little details. Little things like the texturing of control surfaces, high visibility green fiber optics markers around the magnification ring, and other little features that make you feel good about purchasing this scope.

The turrets of the 6T are .2 MRAD per click, which matches the MRAD reticle inside. The clicks are very clean and audible, and the grip surfaces inside the turrets are actually rubberized for easier grip whether using gloves or your bare fingers.

As far as the reticle itself, this might be one place where I wish they had put just a tiny bit more into it. Some people like a simple and clean reticle, while others like a reticle with many useful hold point to use. Being that I am a bit of a distance junkie, regardless of the rifle I’m using at the time, I find myself in the second camp. I like a reticle with plenty of hold-over positions to use and accompanying wind holds as well. While the reticle in the 6T is plenty useful, it wouldn’t have hurt my feelings to see a bit more detail to the reticle. That said, Sig also offers the 7.62 Extended Range reticle in this scope, which is better for that kind of shooting. I completely understand that most people might not need or care about this, and if you like just a few simple hold-over points, you will more than likely love this reticle.

Conclusion
In a market that is flush with many great options across nearly every price range, the Sig Sauer Tango 6T stands out as a spectacular LVPO. I think you would have to spend significantly more money to get a noticeably better scope with these same features. This while the 6T is significantly better looking than scopes that are only 10-20% less on the market. So at least in my opinion, it would be worth spending a little bit more to step up the Sig Sauer Tango 6T.

Sig Sauer Tango Series Electro Optic

When a company like Sig Sauer jumps into the optics market, paying attention is a must. I was more than happy to get my hands on a couple specimens early on, and I was very happy with my purchase.
The Sig Sauer Tango line of optics is marketed towards precision shooters, long-range shooters, and hunters, as well as tactical marksmen in the LE/MIL community. I’ve been exposed to quite a few good optics in that realm, so I wanted to see how Sig stacked up.

For the purpose of this article, I will be comparing two of the Tango series of riflescopes. One is the Tango 4 which is a 4-16X44, the other is a Tango 6 5-30X56. The comparison will simply be an evaluation as these scopes are peers of different levels and price points.

The Tango 6 seen on my Desert Tech MDR 6.5 Creedmoor

Features
For starters, let’s look at the features they share, then we will look at them individually.
All Tango series scopes feature Sig’s HDX coated lenses for optimal light transfer, waterproofing, Lock-Down turrets, and one free laser-etched turret that is matched to your custom load data and atmospheric conditions.
Both the T4 and T6 are Front Focal Plane (FFP) optics, which means the reticle is placed after the magnifier inside the scope. This means the reticle will grow and shrink with the magnification setting. I prefer this configuration as it makes reticle usage more uniform, regardless of the power ring setting.
Both scopes are available with the MRAD/Moa milling reticle, or the Mrad/Moa DEV-L reticle, for those that prefer one system over the other.
The T4 and T6 also have the available MOTAC™ (Motion Activated Illumination) that initiates when motion is detected and shuts off when motionless.

The differences between the two scope are probably where most people are going to make a choice. The T4 is a 4X scope, and the T6 is a 6X, the T6 allows a wider choice of magnification from 5X all the way up to 30X. The T6 also has a larger diameter tube, it’s 34MM tube allows the T6 a greater internal adjustment range. To this larger tube is owed the 12 MRAD (30 MOA) per revolution of the turret. The slightly smaller T4 has a 10 MRAD (25 MOA) of adjustment per revolution of the turret. The 4X magnification on the T4 also gives it a shorter magnification range of 4-14, depending on your application these two different ranges of adjustment could make your choice for you.

The Tango 4 mounted to my Tikka T3 25 Creedmoor

The T6 that I purchased, also features Sig’s Level-Plex anti-cant system. It is a digital system that uses internal sensors to tell you when the scope is level or not. When engaged (by pushing the outer end of the parallax turret) there are two small illuminated arrows visible through the reticle. You simply adjust the cant of your rifle following the indicators, and when the rifle is level the indicators go dark, showing that the rifle is level. It is a simple and very quick to use system.

On the Range

Turret and other control detail on the Tango 6

Shooting the Tango 4 and 6 made me like them even more. The overall clarity of both scopes was very good, and the bright images made target acquisition and spotting hits and misses a piece of cake. Whether in the bright midday sun or in the waning light of evening, I found the scopes presented more than a satisfactory image.
I did find that for shooting groups that I really appreciated the 30 power magnification of the T6, and the DEV-L reticle provided very precise measurements for both corrections and wind holds. The simpler MRAD Milling reticle in the T4 was also very useful for those who might want a reticle that isn’t so busy. And the lower magnification of the T4 made it a great option for my hunting rifle. Lighter, smaller, and easier to quickly bring onto target.
The process of zeroing the scopes, and setting the zero stop was simple, quick, and effective. In no time I had them zeroed, and was dialing them up and down for distant shots. The Level-Plex system on the T6 proved to be very handy in the field, a simple push of a button engages it, and I never had to take my eye off the target. And it turns itself off after a few minutes. I also like the locking turrets on the scopes, raising them unlocks the turret for smooth rotation, and once set, you can push them back down to lock them in place and avoid accidental adjustments.
If I had to say I didn’t like anything about the scopes, it would probably be regarding the sliding up and down of the turret. I have no basis to prove this theory other than feel, but it seems that when the turret is raised it is not as firmly supported. It feels as if you were to knock it against something hard in the up/unlocked position it could be easily broken. Again, I have no evidence to prove that, it is just a simple observation. To be fair it feels rock-solid when it is down in the locked position.
Perhaps the only other gripe I have is likely a simple defect that is easily repaired. The two fiber optic illuminators that indicate the setting on the power ring seemed to be poorly mounted on my T6. One of them came out and was lost, not a big deal, but something worth noting. I usually don’t focus too hard on the actual setting of the magnification ring anyways, I just adjust it till it looks right to my eye, and shoot.

Conclusion

I think that both of these Sig Sauer optics are fantastic scopes, they definitely come in at two different price points so you can pick one the one that best fits your budget. The T4 at its $719.99 MSRP is a great competitor for the sub $1000 FFP Milling reticle scope market, I think it would compete very well against any scope in that group. The larger and much more expensive T6 MSRP $3,119.99 (as tested) is in another group altogether. I would say pending a few more hard trips into the rugged mountains, and it surviving the beating therein, I would put it against any scope in the 2k to 3k dollar range. The quality is there for sure, the only concern I have yet is with durability over time, but so far I have no reason to think it won’t
clear that hurdle as well. It is quite clear that the engineers at Sig Sauer Electro-Optics took great care in every little feature, whether it is the griping surfaces of adjustment knobs, or something as simple as aesthetic angles and accessories. And with an unlimited lifetime warranty, you can confidently put one of these scopes to work today.

-CBM