Tag Archives: optic

Sig Sauer Tango 6T 1-6

Low Power Variable Optics (LVPO’s) have been flooding through the firearm market for years now, likely due to the proliferation of medium-range carbines. It didn’t take long for shooters to realize the value of variable low power optics, but what makes an LVPO shine over another?

Sig Sauer has long been a big name in the firearms industry, I’ve been a big fan as long as I’ve been a gun owner. So it came as no surprise several years ago when Sig brought their own line of optics to market. What was a surprise, at least to me, was how invested I would get.

My first Sig optics was a Tango 6 5-30, a high powered riflescope with all of Sig Sauer’s bells and whistles. It has been a great scope for several years, and still enjoys its place on one of my favorite rifles.
What is the Tango 6T
Todays subject is about a newer generation Tango 6, the the Tango 6T which is a smaller Tango, a 1-6 Low Power Variable Optic. The 6T features Sig’s high quality and clear lenses for which they are well known. The 1-6 power 6T features a 30mm tube and a front focal plane 5.56 horseshoe ballistic reticle with illumination.
There are a couple different configurations for the 6T, the one I ordered came in FDE only. It also features a line lengthwise down the side of the tube, this eases the mounting of the scope by giving a reference point to evenly seat the scope in the rings. There also came a “cattail”, which is a clamp-on handle to give the user better purchase when trying to adjust the magnification setting.

I mounted the 6T in the Strike Industries ASM mount, an adjustable scope mount that can cantilever the optic out to several different positions. The ASM is a sexy looking companion for the Sig 6T.

After mounting the scope, it was time to zero it, an easy task using the finger adjustable turrets. When not in use the turrets are capped. I installed the CR2032 battery into the illumination turret and lit up the Horseshoe reticle. The 8 position rheostat has an off setting between each number, and also has a push-pull lock to avoid accidental adjustment.
On the Range
My first impression on the range was the image, my eyes were swept from their sockets by the crystal clear and bright image. I am more of a 1-8 fan than a 1-6, but this 1-6 is so beautiful I’d have a hard time turning it down for two more X’s. The 6T has parallax set to 150 meters, so shooting targets that are out there a little further is not a problem.
This was very convenient because I ran the 6T on two different rifles, both of which were very capable downrange performers. First it was mounted on the Armalite M-15 Comp Rifle, a match grade competition rifle built specifically for 3-gunning. I found the M-15 to be very accurate, and with the Tango 6T mounted on it, it was a near unstoppable setup. The low power setting of the Sig made up close targets easily and accurately engaged with both eyes open. And zooming in to 6X gave me enough magnification to pick out distant targets, and the Horseshoe reticle had very handy hold points for those distances.
I never expect ballistic reticles to match perfectly, its nearly impossible unless you are shooting the exact same ammunition in the exact same conditions as those who designed the reticle. The same goes for custom scope turrets, but the good news is that its pretty close. Modern flat shooting cartridges have a fairly similar trajectory so the drop points on the reticle are certainly close enough to be useful.

I also mounted the Sig 6T on my Desert Tech MDRX, which is a multi-caliber rifle. I shot it using both 223 and 6mm ARC barrels, both of which have been very accurate and have done well at various ranges. The 6T felt right at home on top of my MDRX, a much more compact rifle than the Armalite. Maneuvering around obstacles for shooting positions was much easier, and regardless of how close or far away the targets were, the Sig provided a beautiful sight picture with bright images. I keep bringing that up, but that may be the part I like the most about this scope, the optical clarity.

There is more to it than just optical clarity though, the engineers at Sig paid attention to so many little details. Little things like the texturing of control surfaces, high visibility green fiber optics markers around the magnification ring, and other little features that make you feel good about purchasing this scope.

The turrets of the 6T are .2 MRAD per click, which matches the MRAD reticle inside. The clicks are very clean and audible, and the grip surfaces inside the turrets are actually rubberized for easier grip whether using gloves or your bare fingers.

As far as the reticle itself, this might be one place where I wish they had put just a tiny bit more into it. Some people like a simple and clean reticle, while others like a reticle with many useful hold point to use. Being that I am a bit of a distance junkie, regardless of the rifle I’m using at the time, I find myself in the second camp. I like a reticle with plenty of hold-over positions to use and accompanying wind holds as well. While the reticle in the 6T is plenty useful, it wouldn’t have hurt my feelings to see a bit more detail to the reticle. That said, Sig also offers the 7.62 Extended Range reticle in this scope, which is better for that kind of shooting. I completely understand that most people might not need or care about this, and if you like just a few simple hold-over points, you will more than likely love this reticle.

Conclusion
In a market that is flush with many great options across nearly every price range, the Sig Sauer Tango 6T stands out as a spectacular LVPO. I think you would have to spend significantly more money to get a noticeably better scope with these same features. This while the 6T is significantly better looking than scopes that are only 10-20% less on the market. So at least in my opinion, it would be worth spending a little bit more to step up the Sig Sauer Tango 6T.

-CBM

Rangefinder Shootout

 

Rangefinder Shootout

rangefinders
One of the most important tools a marksman can have in his bag, is a good rangefinder. When I first started shooting, I didn’t have the money to buy one, neither did I have the sense to. Interesting how something seemingly insignificant would soon become indispensable. I figured a lot of these things out the hard way, the stupid way you could even say. Despite my hardheaded approach to distance shooting, I got pretty good at estimating range. A skill that was later confirmed by the rangefinder that had done without far too long.
By the time I finally purchased a laser rangefinder, I had at least gained enough smarts to recognize what I needed.
My first purchase was a Leica 1200, a good piece of equipment that served me very well. I quickly learned as I played with other rangefinders that good ones usually reach beyond their limits. While lower end units, wouldn’t even reach advertised distances.
As my skills matured, and distances became longer, I out grew that old Leica, and it’s since been replaced by a newer CRF model. I also stepped up to a Swarovski Laserguide, as with my Leica, the Swarovski reached well beyond its advertised envelope, reaching to 1800+ yards in the right conditions.
These tools have sharpened this shooters abilities, through day to day use, and confirming estimations.
Well, I was recently handed one of the new Sig Sauer Kilo 2000 rangefinders. I have heard many good things about this new line of optics from Sig. And this Kilo seemed like a big winner.
With an advertised range of 3400yds (reflective) I was very optimistic. In my opinion, it fell into that price range where rangefinders always underperformed. But even so I thought, if it reaches half what they advertise, it’d be worth the money.
I quickly made my way to my Rocky Mountain haunt, to put the Kilo against my Leica CRF1200, and my Swarovski Laserguide.
I’m a simple guy, I don’t care much for bells and whistles. So though the Kilo features an angle adjusted range, I switched it to simple range only. I can do field math, I like whole numbers, and percentages. I don’t need my optics to do it for me. Plus I like to know exactly what I’m getting into.
A quick run through the various rock piles in my cold and snowy canyon would tell me how well the Kilo measured up. 12790832_1704415849801909_8589088304493706408_n
At the quarter mile mark, all three rangefinders barely broke a sweat. My first impression of the Kilo was how fast it returned with a reading. Faster than my Leica, and twice the speed of the Swarovski. “This will triple the speed at which I miss my targets.” I thought to myself, “better slow down”.
I soon noticed a slight difference in color while looking through the Kilo, a bluish hue that was quite apparent (see pics). This is certainly not a big deal, at least to me. It was certainly lighter as well, easily placed in a pocket to be carried. The optical field of view looking through the Kilo was almost exactly the same as my CRF1200, the quality was comparable as well. Both of them were narrow compared to the Laserguide, which also had a better image I might add. But for twice the price of the others, it ought to.
I pushed all three RF’s one after another out to 1050yds, all three of them working flawlessly. And returning ranges to within +/-1 or 2 yards. Perfectly acceptable for a guy who’s targets are +/-2 or 3 yards wide right?
Up to this point I had to say I was pretty happy about the results. Simply because For most people I know, a good rangefinder that will reliably hit 1,000yds plus and cost under 500$ is a pretty good deal.12321320_1704415956468565_4349457969971441508_n
Well I had to push them further. The sunlight was fading somewhat as it hid behind the evening clouds to the west. I thought surely I could push the Kilo further, but to my surprise I couldn’t get it to read on anything further out.
I thought that perhaps maybe this Kilo couldn’t hang with my “higher end” RF’s. So I pulled out my Leica, and the Top hat it came with, and tried to hit the same rock. To my surprise, it wouldn’t read either. I suppose the light and conditions weren’t good enough for either RF to read. But before I put shame upon the two smaller units, I figured I’d check to see how the Swarovski would fair.
Sure enough, as usual, the Laserguide came through. Showing 1300yds. My suspicions about light angles and conditions were confirmed, as my Swarovski would reach no further in the cold quiet canyon. Leaving me scratching my head.
Further testing is warranted, and no doubt I will get more info. I’d like to see how far this Kilo will really go, I am skeptical that it will actually reach advertised distances due to my experiences, as well as those of others. None the less, I am very impressed that Sig has produced this RF for less than 500$ and that easily hits to 1000 yards and beyond. If I could go back to the beginning of my shooting career and sell myself this Kilo, it may have been one of the best purchases made.
I won’t be replacing my Swarovski anytime soon, but if I was in the market for a new rangefinder, for hunting, or practical shooting, the Kilo 2000 would be top contender.